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Baby Development: Your 4 Month Old

Admin
January 3, 2019 . 2 min read

1. The four-month check-up

Going into your baby’s four-month check-up, your concerns probably relate to feeding and sleeping. At this age, not all babies will be “sleeping through the night,” but it may be time to talk with your pediatrician about sleep training. You might also feel pressure to begin introducing solid foods (though the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends waiting until six months). Be sure to discuss your baby’s growth with the doctor to see if this move is really necessary.

Find out more about your baby’s four-month appointment with Bundoo Pediatrician, Dr. Sara Connolly.

2. Baby\’s first illness

Did you know that your baby could get as many as 12 colds per year? Most are viral infections, meaning antibiotics are not necessary and won’t help. At this age, as your baby’s immune system strengthens, the best you can do is prevent sickness through good hand hygiene and make your baby as comfortable as possible while any illness lasts.Your pediatrician can help you determine if the colds are something more, like an ear infection.

Learn more about your baby’s developing immune system with Dr. Sara Connolly.

3. Time to play!

With each passing day, your baby becomes more interactive and curious about the world. As he or she grows, play will be a crucial part of development. At this age, colorful toys, baby books, and interactive toys that show them cause and effect will keep your baby (and you) entertained for hours!

Get the scoop about the best toys for your 5-month-old with Bundoo Child Psychologist, Eva Roditi.

4. Starting with solids

Your child may have started showing an interest in solid foods, but did you know that he or she needs to be physically ready for this transition, too? Head control, sitting up (without support), and digestive development all play a role in your baby’s readiness for solid foods. That’s why the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends holding off on this transition until at least six months of age.

Concerned about the solid foods transition that lies ahead? Check out our interview with Bundoo Pediatric Nutritionist, Jill Castle.

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